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K-9 Kane retired from the Horry County Sheriff's Office in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

He loved raw eggs.

“Any time we picked up an egg carton from the refrigerator, he knew,” Cpl. Misty Puckett described her dog and partner Kane as a laid-back German Shepard.

One time, Puckett had picked up a couple cartons of fresh eggs from a police dog trainer in Richland County. Many of them didn’t make the trip back home.

“He had actually gotten through the partition center of his kennel and he helped himself to my fresh eggs I had gotten,” Puckett recalled. “I think he ate like seven of them.”

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Cpl. Misty Puckett gently strokes Kane in a final prayer service with the Horry County Sheriff's Office on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

Earlier this week, it was discovered that Kane had developed multiple tumors and was diagnosed with terminal cancer, leading to Puckett making the difficult decision to have him euthanized.

But memories linger.

Along with eggs, Kane enjoyed playing his ball.

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Cpl. Misty Puckett gently strokes Kane’s head in a final prayer service with the Horry County Sheriff's Office on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

“That was his reward,” Puckett said.

Horry County Sheriff Phillip Thompson reflected on how Kane, who was the first K9 officer for the Horry County Sheriff’s Office, commanded the room when he was at work but doing so in a lovable way.

“He would just take over the office. Everybody was so happy to see him and he was happy to see everybody,” Thompson said. “He had his ball with him and he’d come to you and dropped the ball in your lap.”

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K-9 Kane leads Cpl. Misty Puckett to folks they know from Horry County Sheriff's Office for a final prayer service on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

Puckett and Kane first met when she joined the department in 2015 and Kane was already trained in drug detection. During their time together, Puckett trained Kane in human odor detection and handler protection, calling the bond they had ‘indescribable.’

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K-9 Kane retired from the Horry County Sheriff's Office in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

“The dog is more than just a dog,” she said. “The dog is with you essentially 24-seven. The dog goes to work with you. He’s with you all day long. They go home and they’re with you.”

While Puckett said Kane was a relaxed dog, there was one thing that made him a force to be reckoned with.

“He was a gentle giant unless you messed with his momma,” she said. “He always had my back. I had no doubt about that.”

Thompson seconded Puckett’s statement.

“There’s always a bond between a canine and his handler but there was something much stronger between them,” he said.

That bond was evident Friday morning as Puckett and her husband took Kane around the Horry County Justice and Government Center one more time before receiving a full police escort to Murrells Inlet Veterinary Hospital where Kane was euthanized.

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Cpl. Misty Puckett is embraced as Kane waits after a final prayer service with the Horry County Sheriff's Office on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

“It’s a sad day but he gave us a lot of memories,” Thompson said.

Thompson said Puckett and her family have the utmost support from the department during this difficult time.

Kane retired from the Horry County Sheriff’s office in December 2021 at the age of 10. He would’ve been 11 in November.

“He was just fun. Fun to be around and was a hard worker,” Thompson said.

One aspect of her daily routine Puckett said she will miss is having her gym buddy with her.

“He would always go into the gym with me and lay down and he’d watch me workout,” she reflected.

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Cpl. Misty Puckett holds Kane in a final prayer service with the Horry County Sheriff's Office on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

Even in retirement, Puckett said Kane still had a passion for his job.

“He still didn’t fully understand the concept of not going with me anymore,” she said. “He was just one of those one-of-a-kind dogs.”

Less than two months ago, Puckett and her husband purchased property with 46 acres. She said when Kane explored his new home, it was like being a puppy all over again.

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K-9 Kane retired from the Horry County Sheriff's Office in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

“He was wanting to chase the ball, which I don’t allow him to do because he’s old,” she chuckled. “But I would let him have his ball and he wanted to chase his ball with the other dogs. It was just nice to allow him to run about and enjoy his time.”

For Puckett, Kane will always be special for her as her first-ever K9, fulfilling a childhood dream.

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Cpl. Misty Puckett gently strokes Kane’s head in a final prayer service with the Horry County Sheriff's Office on Friday in Conway. Kane retired in December 2021 after serving eight years as a narcotics detection dog with the Sheriff’s office. He was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer and was taken to a veterinary office in Murrells Inlet for euthanasia. Officers escorted him to the veterinary office and funeral home afterwards. Photo by Janet Morgan/janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com

“I always wanted to be a cop and I always wanted to be a canine handler. And he was my very first and allowed me that opportunity,” she said. “We learned a lot together. He needed me as much as I needed him.”

Janet Morgan is the editor of the Myrtle Beach Herald. Contact her at 843-488-7258 or at janet.morgan@myhorrynews.com.

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(3) comments

Tcooper

So the dog was up walking around and was just diagnosed with cancer so you kill him. I don't have any love for the police because they let my daughter die that happened because the little short fat officer wasn't trained to do her job or she just didn't want to do it but why put the dog to sleep if he's still able to walk around and seenm happy. Just a question

Yourekiddingme

Let me answer this “question” for you as I am more than qualified to answer it with actual knowledge…He was in terrible pain and having difficulty breathing as the aggressive cancer had apparently ravaged his entire body in a very short period of time. Oh wait. I know that doesn’t fit your angry hate the police narrative/attitude. You should at least have a teeny tiny clue before spouting off and making a fool of yourself. Based on everything you said in your comment, you just proved you’re not only clueless, but heartless as well. Clearly, you feel it’s better Kane suffer as opposed to being treated with dignity and being allowed to go without pain in peace. Just because he could walk in the 3 seconds you saw in a news video, means nothing. Go take your anger out in a therapist office and not behind the keyboard.

trocarman1

Well said

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