Atlantic Coast Pain Specialists

Fighting pain

A group of office staff and others gathered Tuesday at noon to celebrate the groundbreaking for a new 5,000-square-foot Atlantic Coast Pain Specialists office. The new office will be located at 2767 Cultra Road, across from Horry Electric Cooperative’s headquarters. Pictured are, left to right, Kathy Noonan, Mimi Lee, Courtney Cook, Tiffany McCaskill RN, Jennifer Coleman, R. Blake Kline MD, Rita Cagle NP-C, Lori Cole and Taylor Graham, all with Atlantic Coast Pain Specialists; Rebecca Hardwick with First Citizens Bank and Mckenzie Jordan with Chancel Construction.

Dr. Blake Kline with Atlantic Coast Pain Specialists is counting down the months until his medical practice moves into a new more than 5,000-square-foot building on Cultra Road.

Kline, a pain specialist and anesthesiologist, says his clinic draws from a large area with patients coming from Myrtle Beach, Conway and even as far as Florence.

“The time was right,” he said of his decision to accommodate the growth of his practice. “I bought the land out on Cultra Road and have been working on development of it for about a year, and finally it’s come to fruition.”

Chancel Construction has been selected to build the new office.

With a larger office, Kline plans to hire a second nurse practitioner and add two spinal, joint physical therapists. There will also be room for still another, as yet undeclared medical service.

“We’ll do the same things that we do now, but we’ll have physical therapy in-house and two operating rooms and more space so we can more easily get our patients in without waits,” he said.

Kline is the only doctor in the office. He offers primary internal pain management, spinal stimulation, implants to control pain in any portion of the body and much more.

“So we’ll be a very-easily accessible comprehensive pain management center, the only one of its kind in this area,” he said.

He says everything he does is minimally invasive and primarily done with needles, but he also performs spine surgery.

Kline has been offering his services at 1500 Main St. for the past five years.

He was former chief of anesthesiology at MUSC Florence and worked with Carolina Hospital System of Florence. He decided to focus on pain management in 2012. He later became director of interventional pain management at the Florence Neurosurgery and Spine Center.

The Myrtle Beach resident says when he grew tired of driving three hours everyday, he decided to open an office in Conway.

He treats spinal fractures, most commonly caused by osteoporosis; and provides spinal cord simulation and stimulator implants; steroid injections into the spine; stem cell therapy; human tissue injections; minimally invasive lumber decompressions; help for joints, shoulders, neck, lower back and knees; Medicare-approved stem-cell therapy; and more

He is a graduate of Coastal Carolina University and the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He continued his training through an internship and residency at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. He serves now on the board of the Coastal Carolina University Athletic Foundation and has a suite bearing his name in CCU’s Brooks stadium.

“I’m very entrenched in the community,” he said.

He has a son, who works in medical sales in Myrtle Beach, offering a spinal fusion device, and he also has an 11-year-old daughter.

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I'm the editor of the Horry Independent, a weekly newspaper in Conway, South Carolina. I cover city hall and courts, among many other subjects. Know of a good story? Call me at 843-488-7241.

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